Last edited by Akinonos
Monday, May 11, 2020 | History

5 edition of Foucault and the Law found in the catalog.

Foucault and the Law

Alan Hunt

Foucault and the Law

Towards a Sociology of Law As Governance (Law and Social Theory)

by Alan Hunt

  • 399 Want to read
  • 3 Currently reading

Published by LPC Group .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Jurisprudence & philosophy of law,
  • Sociology, Social Studies,
  • Western philosophy, from c 1900 -,
  • Sociological jurisprudence,
  • Foucault, Michel,
  • Sociology Of Law,
  • Legal Reference / Law Profession,
  • General,
  • Views on law,
  • 1926-1984,
  • Foucault, Michel,

  • The Physical Object
    FormatHardcover
    Number of Pages168
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL7955133M
    ISBN 100745308414
    ISBN 109780745308418

      Foucault and Law by Ben Golder, , available at Book Depository with free delivery worldwide. Critique of Foucault's Expulsion of Law; I Introduction; II Foucault's Imperative Conception of Law; III Sovereignty and Rights in Monarchical and Liberal States; IV Beyond the Disciplinary Society Conclusion: The Dilemma of Freedom PART 3: Deploying Foucault for a Sociology of Law as Governance4.

    Foucault’s Law is the first book in almost fifteen years to address the question of Foucault’s position on law. Many readings of Foucault’s conception of law start from the proposition that he failed to consider the role of law in modernity, or indeed that he deliberately marginalized it/5(3). (Michel Foucault, The History of Sexuality Vol 1, ) Foucault’s analysis leaves open two questions: first, if the juridical is an inappropriate category to use in interpreting bio-power, how do we make sense of all those ‘instruments of the law’ (codes, constitutions, laws, regulations) that have developed and expanded during the Cited by:

      Home › Literary Criticism › Foucault’s Concept of Power. Foucault’s Concept of Power By Nasrullah Mambrol on April 5, • (8). Although the interrogation of power on a wider scale is implicit in Derrida’s deconstruction of logocentrism- the belief that language provides access to truth — the interest in power and its workings that dominates the poststructuraiist criticism of. Foucault traces the juridico-discursive conception of power to the Middle Ages. In that time, absolute monarchies asserted themselves through the rule of law, and law came to be equated with power. Even in the 18th century and later, when absolute monarchies came under criticism, these criticisms always appealed to law and justice.


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Foucault and the Law by Alan Hunt Download PDF EPUB FB2

With this book, Alan Hunt and Gary Wickham produced the first extended examination of the treatment of law by Foucault in his oeuvre. Its publication gave birth to what became known as 'the expulsion thesis' - the idea that Foucault marginalised law's role in Cited by: Foucault’s Law is the first book in almost fifteen years to address the question of Foucault’s position on law.

Many readings of Foucault’s conception of law start from the proposition that he failed to consider the role of law in modernity, or indeed that he deliberately marginalized by: Yet the editors are also committed to showing how that very conflict goes to constitute for Foucault an integral and radical theory of law.

This theory ranges not just beyond the restrained and diminished conceptions of law usually derived from Foucault, but also beyond the characteristic concern in Jurisprudence and Legal Philosophy to constitute law in its difference and separation from other Cited by: 2.

Foucault and Law: Towards a Sociology of Law as Governance. Foucault and Law.: When he died inMichel Foucault was regarded as one of the most profoundly influential philosophers of his day.

Although the law itself never formed a central focus for Foucault, many of the principal themes in his writings are concerned with issues of governance and power that are of direct relevance to the study of law.5/5(1). Foucault's ideas have a dual consequence for the philosophy of law.

Thus, two centuries ago the word norm led a quiet, unremarkable existence, whereas today, along with its panoply of derivations and associated terms, it has become one of the most used and abused terms of our contemporary vocabulary, whether we speak colloquially or as social Cited by: Book Description.

Few thinkers can have had a more diverse or a more contested impact on theorizing law than Michel Foucault. This diversity is reflected in the wide range of Foucault's work and of the intellectual fields it has so conspicuously influenced.

Foucault’s Law is the first book in almost fifteen years to address the question of Foucault’s position on law. Many readings of Foucault’s conception of law start from the proposition that he failed to consider the role of law in modernity, or indeed that he deliberately marginalized it/5(2).

Foucault’s Law is the first book in almost fifteen years to address the question of Foucault’s position on law. Many readings of Foucault’s conception of law start from the proposition that he failed to consider the role of law in modernity, or indeed that he deliberately marginalized it.

Winner of British Sociological Association Philip Abrams Memorial Prize Within feminism incest has often been subsumed under a discussion of sexual violence and abuse. Yet, important as this is, there has been little account of how feminist work itself relates to other ways of talking about and.

The Law and Michel Foucault law, a re-evaluation of the relationship between the other mechanisms of power and the law is called for.

For Foucault the juridical conception of power relations no longer adequately describes the way in which power predominantly operates in modem society; as Foucault has famously written, 'in political thought and. Foucault’s Law is the first book in almost fifteen years to address the question of Foucault’s position on law.

Many readings of Foucault’s conception of law start from the proposition that he failed to consider the role of law in modernity, or indeed that he deliberately marginalized by: To adequately understand Foucault's approach to law, however, an appreciation of its location in his wider methodological framework and his analysis of power is necessary.

REASON, SCIENCE, AND EXCLUSION Michel Foucault () was born in Portier, France, the son of a surgeon. As is often the case with highly original intellectuals, Foucault's. With this strand of argument, the book Foucault’s Law is relegated to being the polar opposite of ‘the expulsion thesis’ so-called.

As is fairly well known, this is a thesis that says that with the advent of modernity Foucault expelled law from its erstwhile significance in society and relegated it to a position of utter subordination to.

Winner of British Sociological Association Philip Abrams Memorial Prize Within feminism incest has often been subsumed under a discussion of sexual violence and abuse. Yet, important as this is, there has been little account of how feminist work itself relates to other ways of talking about and understanding incest.

In Interrogating Incest Vikki Bell focuses on the issue of incest and its. III. DISCIPLINE 3. Panopticism The following, according to an order published at the end of the seventeenth century, were the measures to be taken when the plague appeared in a town.

First, a strict spatial partitioning: the closing of the town and its outlying districts, a prohibition to leave the town on pain of death, the killing of all stray animals; the division of the town into distinct. With this book, Alan Hunt and Gary Wickham produced the first extended examination of the treatment of law by Foucault in his oeuvre.

Its publication gave birth to what became known as 'the expulsion thesis' - the idea that Foucault marginalised law's role in modernity, or expelled it from his analysis entirely/5(2).

For Hunt and Wickham, and for many scholars in law who have taken their interpretation of Foucault as a point of reference, Foucault (most evidently in books such as Discipline and Punish and the first volume of The History of Sexuality) narrates the demise of law.

In Foucault’s modernity, law has been overtaken by the more insinuative and. In the second section, ‘Foucault’s law’, we articulate a fuller picture of Foucault’s law ‘itself’, in its opposed yet integrally related dimensions.

Our focus in doing so will be the productive irresolution between a present determinacy and an illimitable responsiveness to what lies beyond it.

Thanks to everyone who expressed interest in Vikki Bell's book _Interrogating Incest: Feminism, Foucault and the Law_ I'm not able to provide a full summary as some have requested because I don't have a lot of spare time on my hands [note the infrequency of my posts--I have two jobs.

The Order of Things: An Archaeology of the Human Sciences (French: Les mots et les choses: Une archéologie des sciences humaines) is a book by the French philosopher Michel was translated into English and published by Pantheon Books in (Foucault had preferred L'Ordre des Choses for the original French title, but changed the title because it had been used by two.

the charge of Foucault reducing law to (negative) criminal law in Discipline and Punish, in the same book there is reference to law as reciprocal contract; as a matter.For Kirstie McClure, Foucault in this period of his work arrives at a set of fairly “dismal conclusions with regard to the potential of rights as a language of political contestation or resistance.” 58 For Alan Hunt and Gary Wickham, in their Foucault and Law: Towards a Sociology of Law as Governance, Foucault’s attitude to rights amounts.The approach was inspired by the work of both Michel Foucault and Jacques Derrida, and by critical theory.

[4] Foucauldian discourse analysis, like much of critical theory, is .